“Slow Living” – What You Need to Know

Autumn, Cabin Life

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  1. Michael says:

    Wow Ashley spot on with that perspective. Some points that I never looked at that way…truly reinforcing slow living. Beautiful written with so much depth to still explore thank you for sharing such a life enriching purpose/change.

    PS my vote is two blog posts on personal slow living experience and how to slow live.

    ….. not looking for the high road or low road, just wandering on the slow road.

  2. vicki ketchum says:

    Thank you. I have wanted to “slow” myself for awhile and you brought a clearer picture on how to do that. Meaningful to me is people (and animals!) not things or how many places I can go. But i do struggle with the busy mind; that infinite check list of things i “have” to get done “today”. Can you offer some wisdom on this or insight on how or what has worked for you?

    • Hey Vicki, I hope you don’t mind but your comment caught my attention. I used to drive myself crazy doing all the things perfectly all the time. Over the years I learned to ask myself if it’s important.

      I mean, is it really going to matter if I prune my tomato plants? No. The only reason I was doing it was so it looked pretty and our neighbors didn’t complain about what dirty messy hippies we are. There are so many things I stopped doing or restructured, for instance, we clean our house once a month now, not weekly.

      Finally, stop trying to do so much. I try to only have 3 (really important) things on my to-do list each day. Honestly, I usually add a 4th or 5th, and never get to them. But having a growing list that gets longer each day isn’t helpful. I’ve found that narrowing my focus to what’s important and attainable has helped. It’s defintely a journey. Hope that helps a little.

  3. So much to chew on here. First off, I didn’t know that there was a slow living movement and this delights me, maybe even more than the slow food movement.

    I’m on board with everything you’re saying here. I walked away from the corporate world almost 5 years ago and we’ve been very intentional with all of our tools and resources, including time, ever since. We’d never go back to our old way of life. I honestly don’t know how I did it.

    I think about this topic a lot and I’ll try to be brief. I think that for most people, once we hit a basic level of income where we can make ends meet and have a little left over for fun, the satisfaction we get from more money and “success” levels out. Don’t get me wrong, I’d love to have enough money for a home on the North Shore of both Minnesota and the island of Hawaii. But what am I willing to trade for that?

    I could write a whole darn book on this, but I think that’s where we go wrong in our culture. We’re taught to chase “success” and to look successful at all costs. We might be $350,000 in debt, but at least we look like we made it. All while being miserable, working a job we hate but can’t afford to lose, and maybe even popping some pills or other forms of numbing.

    Most of us were never taught to stop and ask what we *really* want and what’s *really* important. And let me tell you, those of us who are brave enough to actually do it, better be ready for plenty of snide and hurtful comments. Not to project our experience, but I find this is pretty universal.

    That’s why I love that you’re sharing this message and your story. We need more people to step up and say it’s okay to create your own life. Going to college, getting married, buying a house, having a baby, getting a promotion, buying a bigger house, …. None of these things guarantee happiness. (<- Another loaded word) Figure out what's right for you and start taking the steps to get there. And if your people don't support you, they're not your people.

    Okay, this is where I cut myself off. Thanks for sharing and giving me even more to get lost in my head over.

  4. […] you read my post on Slow Living, you’ll know that the quality of your focus in the present moment is everything when it comes […]